APS @ The Rainbow Serpent Festival

The Australian Psychedelic Society attended the
Rainbow Serpent Festival

This January the APS crew have been having a good ole time at the Rainbow Serpent Festival.

This year we hosted a panel discussion alongside PRISM: Psychedelic Research in Science & Medicine and Mind Medicine Australia.
We also hosted a stall where we collected thousands of signatures for the Students for Sensible Drug Policy Australia campaign for pill testing #BeHeardNotHarmed.
We can’t wait for the next one!

Bufo Alvarius- The Underground Secret

A Past event hosted By Australian Psychedelic Society- Sydney

The Australian Psychedelic Society hosted an event for the The film ‘Bufo Alvarius; The Underground Secret’, it was a captivating journey documenting the transformative effects of the compound 5-MeO-DMT from the venom of the B. Alvarius toad upon a group of Czech explorers. The participant interviews are superbly complimented by the extensive wisdom of Stanislov Grof, a haunting soundtrack and exquisite graphic representations, offering a thorough demonstration of just how powerful this substance and accompanying ritual can be.

Sebastian Job’s presentation expanded on the film’s themes, delving into the rising popularity of 5-MeO-DMT/Toad Venom by applying a conceptual framework that explored the various tangents of interpretation that arise from, and are brought to the profundity of this experience. Using a rubric of sorts, Sebastian aligned Panglossian philosophy, Western approaches to ‘non-duality’ with key paradigms in which responses to this “existential truth event” tend to fall and are understood. Using these perspectives, Sebastian also explored the significance and implications of such revelatory immersions on humanity’s future, looking at the role of spiritual gnosis, the paradoxical nature of articulating the divine and the potential of such entheogenic compounds as catalysts, agents of change and pedagogical tools. This event provided a wonderful insight into a fascinating compound.

The Ethics of Funding Psychedelic Research

Right now, there is a debate occurring within the psychedelic community that is raising some interesting and important questions.  From whom is it appropriate to take money to fund psychedelic research? How do we fund research, yet remain open and ethical?

The statement on open science and open praxis was published on Chacruna earlier this year, and was signed by many leaders in the psychedelic community. It aims for the following:

1) We will strive for intellectual and scientific integrity.
2) We will work to serve the welfare of the individuals and communities involved.
3) We will not withhold, nor require others to withhold, materials or knowledge for commercial advantage.
4) We will strive to place our discoveries into the public domain, for the benefit of all.

MAPS signed this statement. They have also recently been criticised for taking money from The Mercer Family Foundation to help fund its research.
This foundation has ties to right-wing groups which may be seen as antithetical to the psychedelic communities ethos.
Is taking donations from this company against the statements described above?

COMPASS Pathways have also been criticised for their approach to funding research. COMPASS are now set to begin phase 2 clinical trials of psilocybin for depression. Compass is a for-profit company, and they have not signed the statement on open science and open praxis. Does this mean we should not be supporting this research?

Is it naive to think that psychedelic research can be performed without the backing of “big pharma”? The reality is, clinical trials are expensive and pharmaceutical companies can afford to pay for them. All they ask is that be able to make money in return. If we do not rely on pharmaceutical companies, how will expensive clinical trials get funded? Is this a compromise that need be taken to ensure these medicines make it to the general public quicker?

Listen to the criticisms on the psychedologist radio show with David Nickles, and in these articles written by David Nickles and Jae Sevelius on Chacruna.